Jamey Johnson’s 5th Annual Golf Tournament and Benefit Concert Raises $72,000

randy-edited-webNikki Mitchell Foundation (NMF) hosted Jamey Johnson’s fifth annual homecoming golf tournament and concert at the Cottonwood Golf Course in Montgomery, Ala., Oct. 9. Bringing some levity to an otherwise serious sport, the tournament featured activities such as shooting off a mattress, archery drives, shot carts and a ball launcher. The all-day event featured celebrity guests and ended with heartfelt performances by Grammy-nominated country star Jamey Johnson, Alison Krauss, LeeAnn Womack, Randy Houser, Jerrod Neimann and other friends. Country legend Randy Travis made an appearance on stage and stood beside Jamey as the latter sang Randy’s songs.

“I’m so grateful to my friends for donating their time to fight pancreatic cancer,” Jamey Johnson said. “This is important to me because I’ve lost so many friends to pancreatic cancer in the last few years.”

“Nikki Mitchell was one of the most incredible women to walk this earth, and anyone who knew her would say the same thing,” said Joanna Ott of Carter’s Chord, who has performed at NMF events. “She touched so many lives. Pancreatic cancer took hers too soon, as it does so many people. The foundation donates money to research for early detection and the cure of pancreatic cancer. It’s a great cause and her legacy lives on through it.”

Nikki Mitchell Foundation is dedicated to seeking and supporting the most breakthrough data available for the early detection and cure of pancreatic cancer. Not tied to any one hospital, NMF supports the most promising research while maintaining a focus on awareness and patient support. NMF actively promotes a special emphasis on prevention and the patient’s’ preferences in determining their care.

For more information about NMF or Jamey Johnson’s Homecoming Golf Tournament:

Contact: Ariane Watkins

Phone: 615.982.6802

Email: ariane@nikkimitchellfoundation.org

Website: www.facebook.com/JameyJohnsonGolf

Photo by Kerri Horne.

Jamey Johnson, Bobby Bare and Tony Joe White Raise $42,000 at “Whiskey Bread Pudding” Benefit Concert

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Nikki’s friends, Jamey Johnson, Bobby Bare, and Tony Joe White came together in a rare intimate setting, Sept. 21 at the Franklin Theatre, for a night of music, song, and stories.

Nikki Mitchell Foundation (NMF) president Rhonda Miles said, “NMF recently celebrated our three-year anniversary and we are excited about our growth.”

“Nikki’s musician friends have graciously and unselfishly given of their time and financial support to help propel this organization forward. Without our artists and their generosity, we couldn’t do this,” Miles said. “This year, we are donating funds to research and our direct patient services program Bridge of Wings, where we provide patients with gas cards or Uber rides to treatment, monthly Blue Apron meals, house cleanings, and even prescription co-pays. All these things seem small and simple, but when you are battling pancreatic cancer, they are huge. We know Nikki would be proud of our progress and the way we are bridging her giving spirit with the patient’s road to a cure.”

Nikki Mitchell Foundation is dedicated to seeking and supporting the most breakthrough data available for the early detection and cure of pancreatic cancer. Not tied to any one hospital, NMF supports the most promising research while maintaining a focus on awareness and patient support. NMF actively promotes a special emphasis on prevention and the patient’s’ preferences in determining their care.

For more information about NMF or Whiskey Bread Pudding:

Contact: Ariane Watkins

Phone: 615.982.6802

Email: ariane@nikkimitchellfoundation.org

Photo by Tom Thompson

 

Weight loss: When cancer immunotherapies are rendered ineffective

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Nov 10, 2016

According to a new study, a weight loss condition that affects cancer patients could make immunotherapy ineffective. It explains why the approach of boosting a patient’s immune system to treat the disease fails in a lot of people.

Cancer immunotherapies involve activating a patient’s immune cells to recognize and destroy cancer cells. They have shown great promise in some cancers, but so far have only been effective in a minority of patients with cancer. The reasons behind these limitations are not clear.

Researchers at the University of Cambridge have found evidence that the mechanism behind a weight loss condition which affects patients with cancer could also be making immunotherapies ineffective. The condition, known as cancer cachexia, causes loss of appetite, weight loss and wasting in most patients with cancer towards the end of their lives.

However, cachexia often starts to affect patients with certain cancers, such as pancreatic cancer, much earlier in the course of their disease. Scientists found that that even at the early stages of cancer development in mice, before cachexia is apparent, a protein released by the cancer changes the way the body, in particular the liver, processes its own nutrient stores.

“The consequences of this alteration are revealed at times of reduced food intake, where this messaging protein renders the liver incapable of generating sources of energy that the rest of the body can use,” said Thomas Flint, from the University of Cambridge’s School of Clinical Medicine.

“This inability to generate energy sources triggers a second messaging process in the body — a hormonal response — that suppresses the immune cell reaction to cancers, and causes failure of anti-cancer immunotherapies,” Flint said. “Cancer immunotherapy might completely transform how we treat cancer in the future — if we can make it work for more patients,” said Tobias Janowitz, from University of Cambridge.

“Our work suggests that a combination therapy that either involves correction of the metabolic abnormalities, or that targets the resulting hormonal response, may protect the patient’s immune system and help make effective immunotherapy a reality for more patients,” said Janowitz. “If the phenomenon that we have described helps us to divide patients into likely responders and non-responders to immunotherapy, then we can use those findings in early stage clinical trials to get better information on the use of new immunotherapies,” said Duncan Jodrell, from the Cambridge Cancer Centre.

“Understanding the complicated biological processes at the heart of cancer is crucial for tackling the disease — and this study sheds light on why many cancer patients suffer from both loss of weight and appetite, and how their immune systems are affected by this process,” said Nell Barrie, from Cancer Research UK.

The research was published in the journal Cell Metabolism.

Thanksgiving Meals for patients and their families

l-ncjbmzrwlnsfcfjz-copyBeing from Texas, Nikki chose to go home for Christmas and stay in Nashville for Thanksgiving. She started a tradition for her friends with a home cooked meal for “Friendsgiving”. It was one of her favorite things to do and her friends who had family out of town had a warm, inviting place to go. Having pancreatic cancer, going to treatments and feeling sick didn’t stop her from this tradition. She made sure there was a Friendsgiving meal for everyone.

This year we are doing the same thing for cancer patients –  Nikki’s foundation is providing a “Friendsgiving Meal” for PC patients and those living with them. NMF is asking you to donate to the Bridge of Wings program. In addition to helping cancer patients with their daily living expenses, we’re providing holiday meals for them and their families.

MATCHING DONATIONS – A loyal supporter of NMF who has been impacted by pancreatic cancer has pledged to match donations up to $2500! 

To donate to our Bridge of Wings program for Thanksgiving meals, click here and to learn more about BOW, check it out here.